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Page url: http://www.soundvision.com/Info/halalhealthy/halal.kosher.asp


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Mark S, Seattle - wrote on 9/16/2010 12:39:18 PM
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Comment:A shochet doesn't have to be a rabbi - he or she just must say the right prayers. And while the actual word (in Hebrew) is not said, "the Lord" (Adonai) IS said...


Junaid, Attock, Pakistan - wrote on 8/23/2010 2:29:43 AM
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Comment:There are several issues with Kosher: 1. In Judaism, the rules and methods of slaughtering are not open and published. Unlike in Islam, where any adult sane Muslim can slaughter an animal by following the rules prescribed by Shariah, in Judaism only one kind of Rabbi, known as the Sachet, may slaughter Kosher animals. The Sachet is specially trained for this purpose and no other Jew can slaughter an animal. Although Jews say that they slaughter in the name of God, we do not know what else they say in Hebrew while slaughtering. Their prayers and methods of slaughtering are in the hands of a few people and are not generally known. 2. The Sachet does not say prayers on all animals he slaughters at a time. Instead, he only says prayers on the first and last animals he slaughters. For example, if a Sachet has to slaughter ten cows, he will only say the prayer on the first and tenth cow while slaughtering, saying nothing on the cows in between. This method of slaughtering is not similar to the method prescribed by Sharia for Hanafi sect, nor is it similar to the practice of Ahle-kitab at the time of our beloved Prophet Mohammed Sallallahu Alaihi Wasallum. Meat slaughtered by Ahlekitab was considered halal because of similarity in the slaughtering method and in the Niya at that time. These are the reasons why most Ulama do not consider Kosher meat halal.


Riz, London - wrote on 6/14/2010 9:27:34 AM
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Comment:AsSalaamu-alaykum, Wildly inaccurate details regarding Judaism and laws of Kashrut. Brother Ben explained most of the issues regarding the inaccuracies in the article, but I would like to add for further clarification that Kashrut laws regarding food and drink only have one unhalal aspect... that is alcohol. As for gelatine being from any animal and marshmallows bearing the Kosher sign having Haram ingredients... Never..No way.. in fact the laws of Kashrut often go above and beyond Islamic laws for halal... for example.. Halal butchers do not inspect the food that the animal was raised on before buying an animal, they do not inspect the carcass for signs of disease or ill treatment/ ill health. In fact Kosher food is more than Halal (except for Kosher alcohol products of course). There is in fact no doubt and an Ijma (consensus) amongst mainstream Sunni scholars that Kosher meat products in the absence of Halal availability is a valid food and completely permissable. The sad thing about all of this is that anyone can just Google these concepts and get lots of information at the click of a button instead of having to raise controversial arguments in forums. Aanyways. have a great day InshaAllah.. and Salaam to all.


Malek, Sydney - wrote on 5/5/2010 7:22:07 AM
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Comment:I understand where Ben is coming from. I too share his concens about the passage. I dont think the passage adds anything to what otherwise is an informative and balanced article. In my view the passage should be removed or as a minimum clarified and footnoted with a source. As a Muslim I find it fustrating when the views of a minority group are presented as mainstream, so if the passage is drawn from similar circumstances, I strongly urge that it is completely removed. I have only just discovered the website and I am finding it very informative. Great work brothers and sisters.


Ben, Los Angeles, CA, USA - wrote on 4/19/2010 1:58:11 PM
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Comment:Thank you for the article. It was interesting. Although you clearly have good intentions, your description of the Jewish Kashrut is often inaccurate. The Kashrut (Jewish Dietary Laws) is very strict and detailed with regard to enzymes in cheese, slaughter technique, and parts of an animal deemed fit for consumption. In fact, the requirements for Cheese are so severe, that it is very difficult for Cheese producers to attain Kosher certification. This next line was my least favorite: You said, "They feel that uttering the name of God, out of context, is wasteful." Aside from being offensive, this claim is exceedingly inaccurate. The Kashrut requires a very tedious ritualistic process that includes a prayer to the God in an effort to gain God's blessing for the slaughter of acceptable animals (God's creation) which God has generously provided for our consumption. The exact details of this process certainly vary from the Zabihah process, but the intent (as well as the slaughter technique) is essentially the same. After all, Judaism is an Abrahamic religion. We are not that different. Thanks for for your effort in trying to educate people about this issue. I do not intend to criticize. I just wanted to correct what I believed was inaccurate information. God bless you, Ben


Ben, Los Angeles, CA, USA - wrote on 4/19/2010 1:57:32 PM
Rating: Rating

Comment:Thank you for the article. It was interesting. Although you clearly have good intentions, your description of the Jewish Kashrut is often inaccurate. The Kashrut (Jewish Dietary Laws) is very strict and detailed with regard to enzymes in cheese, slaughter technique, and parts of an animal deemed fit for consumption. In fact, the requirements for Cheese are so severe, that it is very difficult for Cheese producers to attain Kosher certification. This next line was my least favorite: You said, "They feel that uttering the name of God, out of context, is wasteful." Aside from being offensive, this claim is exceedingly inaccurate. The Kashrut requires a very tedious ritualistic process that includes a prayer to the God in an effort to gain God's blessing for the slaughter of acceptable animals (God's creation) which God has generously provided for our consumption. The exact details of this process certainly vary from the Zabihah process, but the intent (as well as the slaughter technique) is essentially the same. After all, Judaism is an Abrahamic religion. We are not that different. Thanks for for your effort in trying to educate people about this issue. I do not intend to criticize. I just wanted to correct what I believed was inaccurate information. God bless you, Ben


Ben, Los Angeles, CA, USA - wrote on 4/19/2010 1:56:54 PM
Rating: Rating

Comment:Thank you for the article. It was interesting. Although you clearly have good intentions, your description of the Jewish Kashrut is often inaccurate. The Kashrut (Jewish Dietary Laws) is very strict and detailed with regard to enzymes in cheese, slaughter technique, and parts of an animal deemed fit for consumption. In fact, the requirements for Cheese are so severe, that it is very difficult for Cheese producers to attain Kosher certification. This next line was my least favorite: You said, "They feel that uttering the name of God, out of context, is wasteful." Aside from being offensive, this claim is exceedingly inaccurate. The Kashrut requires a very tedious ritualistic process that includes a prayer to the God in an effort to gain God's blessing for the slaughter of acceptable animals (God's creation) which God has generously provided for our consumption. The exact details of this process certainly vary from the Zabihah process, but the intent (as well as the slaughter technique) is essentially the same. After all, Judaism is an Abrahamic religion. We are not that different. Thanks for for your effort in trying to educate people about this issue. I do not intend to criticize. I just wanted to correct what I believed was inaccurate information. God bless you, Ben


Ben, Los Angeles, CA, USA - wrote on 4/19/2010 1:56:10 PM
Rating: Rating

Comment:Thank you for the article. It was interesting. Although you clearly have good intentions, your description of the Jewish Kashrut is often inaccurate. The Kashrut (Jewish Dietary Laws) is very strict and detailed with regard to enzymes in cheese, slaughter technique, and parts of an animal deemed fit for consumption. In fact, the requirements for Cheese are so severe, that it is very difficult for Cheese producers to attain Kosher certification. This next line was my least favorite: You said, "They feel that uttering the name of God, out of context, is wasteful." Aside from being offensive, this claim is exceedingly inaccurate. The Kashrut requires a very tedious ritualistic process that includes a prayer to the God in an effort to gain God's blessing for the slaughter of acceptable animals (God's creation) which God has generously provided for our consumption. The exact details of this process certainly vary from the Zabihah process, but the intent (as well as the slaughter technique) is essentially the same. After all, Judaism is an Abrahamic religion. We are not that different. Thanks for for your effort in trying to educate people about this issue. I do not intend to criticize. I just wanted to correct what I believed was inaccurate information. God bless you, Ben


Ben, Los Angeles, CA, USA - wrote on 4/19/2010 1:55:48 PM
Rating: Rating

Comment:Thank you for the article. It was interesting. Although you clearly have good intentions, your description of the Jewish Kashrut is often inaccurate. The Kashrut (Jewish Dietary Laws) is very strict and detailed with regard to enzymes in cheese, slaughter technique, and parts of an animal deemed fit for consumption. In fact, the requirements for Cheese are so severe, that it is very difficult for Cheese producers to attain Kosher certification. This next line was my least favorite: You said, "They feel that uttering the name of God, out of context, is wasteful." Aside from being offensive, this claim is exceedingly inaccurate. The Kashrut requires a very tedious ritualistic process that includes a prayer to the God in an effort to gain God's blessing for the slaughter of acceptable animals (God's creation) which God has generously provided for our consumption. The exact details of this process certainly vary from the Zabihah process, but the intent (as well as the slaughter technique) is essentially the same. After all, Judaism is an Abrahamic religion. We are not that different. Thanks for for your effort in trying to educate people about this issue. I do not intend to criticize. I just wanted to correct what I believed was inaccurate information. God bless you, Ben


Shagufta Zahid, Naugatuck Ct - wrote on 2/8/2010 8:11:26 PM
Rating: Rating

Comment:Thank you so much for this Article........Though we are very careful about Halal and Haram,But This is very common that Muslim use Kosher things,assuming them Halal.Now I can at lest tell my friends as well as Non-Muslims the difference between Halal and Kosher.Jasieakh Allaha


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